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TITLE I

  • A Title I school must have at least 40% of its student population qualify for free or reduced lunch. Services can be delivered in a variety of ways:  pull out, in class, or early intervention. Programs must use instructional strategies based on evidence-based strategies and implement family engagement activities.

    If a student in your class is having academic problems, you may wish to discuss it with the Title I teacher at your school or you may call Kellie Tanner at 256-309-2127.

    Professional Development is a major part of the Title I Program. We work closely with schools to determine their professional development needs and to locate funding for those identified needs.

    Title I Part, A Allowable Uses of Funds in a Schoolwide Program (Based on the Needs Assessment)

    • High-quality preschool or full-day kindergarten and services to facilitate the transition from early learning to elementary education programs.
    • Recruitment and retention of effective teachers, particularly in high-need subjects.
    • Instructional coaches to provide high-quality, school-based professional development.
    • Increased learning time.
    • Evidence-based strategies to accelerate the acquisition of content knowledge for English learners.
    • Counseling, school-based mental health programs, mentoring services, and other strategies to improve students’ nonacademic skills.
    • Activities designed to increase access and prepare students for success in high-quality advanced coursework to earn postsecondary credit while in high school (e.g., Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, early college high schools, and dual or concurrent enrollment programs).
    • Career and technical education programs to prepare students for postsecondary education and the workforce. Examples of Uses of Funds in a Schoolwide Program (Based on the Needs Assessment)
    • Counseling, school-based mental health programs, mentoring services, and other strategies to improve students’ nonacademic skills.
    • School climate interventions (e.g., anti-bullying strategies, positive behavior interventions and supports).
    • Equipment, materials, and training needed to compile and analyze student achievement data to monitor progress, alert the school to struggling students, and drive decision making.
    • Response-to-intervention strategies intended to allow for early identification of students with learning or behavioral needs and to provide a tiered response based on those needs.
    • Activities that have been shown to be effective at increasing family and community engagement in the school, including family literacy programs.
    • Devices and software for students to access digital learning materials and collaborate with peers, and related training for educators (including accessible devices and software needed by students with disabilities).
    • Two-generation approaches that consider the needs of both vulnerable children and parents, together, in the design and delivery of services and programs to support improved economic, educational, health, safety, and other outcomes that address the issues of intergenerational poverty.

    [1] Under ESSA, SEAs have the discretion to waive the forty percent poverty threshold if the SEA believes it will best serve student needs.  ESSA, Section 1114(a)(1)(B). [1] ESSA, Section 1114(b). 

    FEDERAL PROGRAMS LEA Allowable Uses of Funds August 1, 2017 Alabama Department of Education

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